cwgc berlin

on may 2nd the guns fell silent in berlin. some didnt life to see that day.

hi res shots available.

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an irregular visit

every once in while i need to get down to stahnsdorf cemetary.

large files available.copyright andreas reich
bigmanstours[at]gmail.com

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jewish cemetery flosz

in the late 17th century jews got the right of settlement in the small over 1000yrs old market town flosz. a few years later a cemetary was opened. the last burial took place in 1946.

im späten 17.jhd erhielten juden das recht sich in der kleinen, über 1000 jahre alten marktgemeinde floß anzusiedeln. wenige jahre später wurde ein friedhof eröffnet. die letzte beerdigung fand 1946 statt.

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autumn at stahnsdorf südwest

the summer is over. the autumn is overwehlming us with fantastic colours. i went downt to the cemetary in stahnsdorf to get inspiration. hope you like it.

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south western cemetary

In 1922-23 it was decided that the graves of Commonwealth servicemen who had died all over Germany should be brought together into four permanent cemeteries. Berlin South-Western was one of those chosen and in 1924-25, graves were brought into the cemetery from 146 burial grounds in eastern Germany.

There are now 1,176 First World War servicemen buried or commemorated in the Commonwealth plot at Berlin South-Western Cemetery. The total includes special memorials to a number of casualties buried in other cemeteries in Germany whose graves could not be found.

commonwealth war graves commision

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durnbach cementary

durnbach cementery 1/3
durnbach cementery 1/3
durnbach cementery 2/3
durnbach cementery 2/3
durnbach cementery 3/3
durnbach cementery 3/3

The site for Durnbach War Cemetery was chosen, shortly after hostilities had ceased, by officers of the British Army and Air Force, in conjunction with officers of the American Occupation Forces in whose zone Durnbach lay. The great majority of those buried here are airmen shot down over Bavaria, Wurtemberg, Austria, Hessen and Thuringia, brought from their scattered graves by the Army Graves Service. The remainder are men who were killed while escaping from prisoner of war camps in the same areas, or who died towards the end of the War on forced marches from the camps to more remote areas. DURNBACH WAR CEMETERY contains 2,934 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 93 of which are unidentified. One grave in the cemetery (III. C. 22.) contains the ashes of an unknown number of unidentified war casualties recovered from Flossenburg. Also, one grave (IV. A. 21.) contains the remains of 6 unidentified U.K. airmen. There are also 30 war graves of other nationalities, most of them Polish. Within the Indian section of the cemetery will be found the DURNBACH CREMATION MEMORIAL, commemorating 23 servicemen of the army of undivided India who died while prisoners of war in various places in France and Germany, and who were cremated in accordance with their religion.